Posts Tagged ‘1958 Ford front end rebuild’

I must confess, when I started this front end rebuild in August, I really didn’t think I would get it done by the September 15th deadline.  I thought for sure I would eventually run into an insurmountable obstacle. But no such roadblock occurred. I must ALSO confess, I didn’t meet the deadline. Saturday the 15th brought duties that my household and family needed me for. I postponed my car stuff gladly and happily. My brother and his family came by Saturday,and I enjoyed their company, and for my brother helping me unload a ton of wood pellets I had picked up that morning.  He was impressed with the progress I had made on the Ranch Wagon, and offered to help me finish it up on Sunday afternoon.  I took him up on the offer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We got the brake drums ready to be installed by gathering up the new wheel bearing grease, and a lot of rags. Packed the bearings, tightened the nuts down and slipped the cotter pins in. Then we got the tires put on. I was essentially done. However, since I had my brother here to help me, I asked him if he wanted to take a ride to pick up the front clip I had stored over at Bob’s house. “Sure, sounds fun” he said. So on the road we went to get the ’58 Fairlane front clip I had removed from the parts car Bob and I had cut up almost a year ago. (Link to that adventure HERE)

Bob was helpful as ever, helping us load it into the back of my truck, strapping it down, and loading my truck with the other bits and pieces I had stashed away from the parts car behind his Shop.  We were back on the road and ready to get home to get installed back on the car.

We got all our body bolts ready to install, we got the new doghouse/front clip lifted up, and into place.  My 3 nephews ( ages 4, 6 & 7) were in awe of their dad and uncles ability to lift the whole front of a car into the air! They came running at us while he had the front clip in the air, and an attentive Aunt and Mother quickly moved in to keep their awe and amazement at a safe distance.  We got it bolted on, did some shimming and adjustments for the doors to open, and tightened it all down.  We were greeted with a Hero’s welcome from the boys who had witnessed what they thought was the coolest thing ever. We stopped there, as we were also suppose to be Barbequing their lunch!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the kids and family were fed, they decided to take a walk to the city park, which left us guys there to finish bolting it all together. We put the grille and front bumper on, bolted the hood on, and decided we were finished. So, I got the front end done, & as an extra bonus, retrieved the front clip and got it installed.

The stance with the lowered springs looks great. I can’t wait to get the floor boards & rust repair done. I also want to get the 351 Windsor & C4 combo installed.  I can honestly say, this is the most satisfying auto project I have done in a long time.  I haven’t decided what my next goal & deadline are. But I’m sure I will enjoy it as much as the front end rebuild I just accomplished.

I started prepping and assembling the front end at around 9:30 am, and 2 Napa Auto Parts, 1 AutoZone, 5 Diet Cokes, 2 Metal splinters, 1/4 tank of gas, 2 Arby Roast Beefs, 38 miles  and 7 hours later, I am almost done!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I really ran into a problem with hardware. I didn’t have any new castle nuts for the upper ball joints to bolt to the spindle. The lower ball joints had hardware. Also, I needed castle nuts for the tie rod ends because I didn’t want to reuse the old ones. I also needed cotter pins.  A quick trip to the local auto parts store should end that need, right?

WRONG.

The first local NAPA Auto parts store got me this reply: “I don’t carry Castle nuts, but I do have cotter pins.”

Okay. So I bought cotter pins.

A 14 mile drive into the next city with an AutoZone  store brought me Castle nuts, but in metric only. GRRRRRR.

So I traveled across town to a NAPA Auto parts that did have Standard Castle nuts.  Of course, by then it was Lunchtime so a quick detour into the Arby’s drive thru and I was on the road home.

All I have left to do tomorrow is finish painting the brake drums, and get the wheels on and it’ll be landing time.  Wheels on the ground and goal achieved.  My shoulders ache from holding the spindles up, and working the jack to compress the spring from under the lower control arm. My wife already has the Icy Hot on the nightstand ready for a long back rub rehabilitation of this sore Ranch Wagon owner. But it was worth it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Progress from August 4th to September 14.